Artist Spotlight: capsule

Artist Spotlight: Capsule (week four)

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Concluding a four-part look over the Capsule discography, guest writer Josh Anderson takes us from World of Fantasy right up to last year’s Wave Runner – thus, effectively, bringing the series right up to the present day.

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Artist Spotlight: capsule, music

Artist Spotlight: Capsule (week two)

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Josh Anderson’s guest series on Capsule continues with a look at a less often-discussed period of the group’s history, between the initial lounge-pop phase of the first few releases and their more well-known (and popular) forays into dance music.

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Artist Spotlight: capsule, music

Artist Spotlight: Capsule (week one)

 

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Every so often, Memories of Shibuya lets an outside writer do a guest series for the blog’s Artist Spotlight articles; this one comes from reader Josh Anderson, a long-time J-music buff and apparent Capsule superfan. Often one of the most divisive figures in Shibuya-kei, Yasutaka Nakata is still nevertheless one of the most popular names in the genre, and it is a pleasure to present a guest series from someone so knowledgeable and enthusiastic about this polarizing figure.

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Is Perfume Shibuya-kei?

Producer Yasutaka Nakata, who has worked with Hiroshima-based girl group Perfume since 2003, is possibly the most contentious figure when it comes to the question of what does and doesn’t count as “Shibuya-kei.” Few argue that his first handful of albums as capsule count as examples of the genre – especially with how High Collar Girl was seemingly designed to establish capsule as Pizzicato Five’s successors in lieu of the other band’s presence on the scene following their 2001 breakup – but from there on, things get tricky with capsule, and his production work for other performers is even more difficult. Shibuya-kei’s elder spokesman Momus claimed “Shibuya-kei haunts things like [Nakata-produced pop idol] Kyary Pamyu Pamyu,” and lists of Shibuya-kei performers often include at least one Nakata-produced act, but the issue is hardly cut-and-dried; join us as we seek to answer the question of whether or not Perfume should, in fact, be considered “Shibuya-kei.”

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