Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie, music

Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie (week four)

kkjourney

Every month, Memories of Shibuya will be taking a look at a different artist or group, with featured songs – one per week – highlighting the peaks (and, occasionally, troughs) of their musical career.

Concluding his series on the artist whose work he is perhaps most well-known for collaborating on, Momus writes here about the end of an acclaimed and productive working relationship, and the 20th century along with it.

Continue reading

Standard
Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie, music

Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie (week three)

kk3

Every month, Memories of Shibuya will be taking a look at a different artist or group, with featured songs – one per week – highlighting the peaks (and, occasionally, troughs) of their musical career.

After the success of “Good Morning World,” Kahimi Karie was able to enjoy a brief stint as a global pop star in the late ’90s, making hits in her home country of Japan from half a world away. As Karie’s success grew, though, fractures began to appear in her most acclaimed musical partnership, as Nick “Momus” Currie examines in the somewhat melancholy penultimate chapter of our Kahimi Karie spotlight.

Continue reading

Standard
Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie, music

Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie (week two)

gmw2

Every month, Memories of Shibuya will be taking a look at a different artist or group, with featured songs – one per week – highlighting the peaks (and, occasionally, troughs) of their musical career.

In this installment of Memories of Shibuya‘s special look at the ’90s highlights of Kahimi Karie’s musical career, her former songwriting partner Nick “Momus” Currie discusses the biggest hit that he and Karie ever had – and, as writer Ian F. Martin memorably noted, the only time that a reference to The Fall got on the Oricon top 10.

Continue reading

Standard
Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie, music

Artist Spotlight: Kahimi Karie (week one)

kkmem1 Every month, Memories of Shibuya will be taking a look at a different artist or group, with featured songs – one per week – highlighting the peaks (and, occasionally, troughs) of their musical career.

When people talk about Kahimi Karie, the discussion is never about whether or not she was Shibuya-kei royalty; the question is whether she should be called “queen” or “princess.” One of the scene’s most successful artists during the golden age of Shibuya-kei in the mid-’90s, her music took the jet-setting chic of Pizzicato Five one step further – not only singing in multiple languages, but working with a number of outsiders as well. Chief among these outside talents was the Scottish-born Nick “Momus” Currie, who would go on to become a Shibuya-kei legend himself, and Memories of Shibuya is overwhelmingly proud to present his spotlight on Kahimi Karie as our second guest series. Continue reading

Standard